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Word of the week

Word of the Week: Holler [ˈhɔlɐ]

What does Holler mean? How is this Viennese abbreviation for Hollunder linked to horse feathers, claptrap, poppycock, hogwash and tomfoolery?

Word of the Week: Watschen [ˈvaːt͡ʃn̩]

What does Watschen mean? How is this Viennese slang word connected with an infamous German anti-aircraft gun and the Italian word for cymbal?

Word of the Week: Masel [ˈmaːzl̩]

What does Masel mean? How is it used? Learn about how the Austrian dialect word for “luck” is tied to failing, birds and Yiddish language.

Word of the Week: Haberer [ˈhaːbəʁɐ]

What does Haberer mean? How is it used in Austria? Learn about the importance of friends, networks and connections in Austrian society.

Word of the Week: Knödel

What does Knödel mean? How is it used in Austria? It’s another word for dumplings which Austrians love, and it is a slang word for money.

Word of the Week: Wurscht

What does wurscht mean? How is it used in Austria? If you want to communicate your indifference to people in Viennese,"wurscht" is your word.

Word of the Week: anbraten

What does anbraten mean? How is it used in Austria? Are you new to Vienna and interrested in the dating scene? Here's some local lingo.

Word of the Week: Glumpert [ˈɡlʊmpɐt]

Junk, crap; broken, useless, things. Orig. from Gelumpe (rags). Note that Glumpert generally does not refer to actual garbage – after all, trash is simply the detritus of something useful that has served its purpose.

Word of the Week: sekkieren [sɛɡiːɐ̯n̩]

To bother, pester or annoy someone. So the implication is that you are desiccating someone, making them itchy and irritable like dry skin with literally “withering” remarks.

Word of the Week: sudern [ˈzuːdɐn]

To complain, bitch, moan or grumble. And someone who frequently engages in such pessimistic ramblings is called a Suderant. Origin most likely from sieden (to simmer), the implication being that instead of an outburst, anger simmers steadily beneath the surface, never boiling over.

Word of the Week: deppert [ˈdɛpɐt]

Verb. To march arduously, to slog, plod or trudge; can also mean to limp and, by extension, to strut (comparable to “pimp walk”).

Word of the Week: Hatschen [ˈhaːʧn̩]

Verb. To march arduously, to slog, plod or trudge; can also mean to limp and, by extension, to strut (comparable to “pimp walk”).

Word of the Week: i-tüpferl-Reiter [i:-dYpfəl-raɪtʰə]

Noun.Lit. “i-dot-rider;” A pedantic person; a stickler; someone who insists on dotting all “i’s” and crossing all “t’s.”

Word of the Week: Gründerzeit [ˈɡʁʏndɐˌt͡saɪ̯t]

Noun. Lit. Founder’s Era. A time during the second half of the 19th century where Austria (Austria-Hungary after 1867) became industrialized and under went unprecedented modernization and growth.

Word of the Week: Jause [‘jaʊ̯zə]

Noun. A snack, or a (usually cold) meal served in between the standard breakfast, lunch and dinner, although coffee and cake also qualifies. Orig...

Word of the Week: Bagage [baˈɡaːʃ]

Noun. Riffraff, reprobates, a group of people you generally hold a low opinion of. A loanword from French that made it into the Viennese ...

Word of the Week: Bürgerschreck

Noun. Lit. "Terrorizer of the Bourgeoisie;" A person who deliberately tries to shock and offend the conservative middle classes with prov...