Many thanks for your thoughts, ideas and insights! If you have something to say about Vienna or a story you read here, tell us all about it. Send an email to office@metropole.at.

 

To the editor,

(in response to our Facebook share of the Washington Post article “Austria’s new Anti-Burqa law isn’t Quite Working as Intended“)

On behalf of the Austrian people (im Namen der Republik) I apologize for the prolonged stupidity of Austrian lawmakers in the last years (and presumably the years to come). Not only is the law in itself stupid, it is (like so many others) just horribly done from a legal standpoint. I pity the police officers (and judges) who have to face this kind of idiocracy.

Michael Johann Kraeftner, Facebook

To the editor,

(in response to the Facebook post “What does ‘The Good Life’ in Vienna mean to you?”)

Funnily enough, the good life in Vienna is just leaving my flat for going to Uni: I walk past myriad coffee shops and I am always tempted to skip class and just spend hours reading newspapers. Drinking coffee and reading sounds so cliché, but it’s not only about Espresso – it’s about the possibility to sit in an old building and feel royal all the time: The best thing in Vienna is that you don’t necessarily have to do something special to live the good life. It’s always there, waiting for you to grab it.

Markus Schwarz, Facebook

To the editor,

(in response to the Facebook post “Share your own ‘On the Edge’ Experience”)

I will never forget when a long time ago I was working night shift for a bank in the center of Athens, Greece and there was a demonstration which turned to riot. The ground floor of the building was already on fire but I had not realized that until I turned on the radio and heard that some of the buildings in the center of the city were on fire. I immediately left the office on the 5th floor and used the stairs trying to escape. Fortunately the fire had not expanded yet and I managed to get out of the building safe.

George Veliantis, Facebook

To the editor,

(in response to the Facebook post “Share your own ‘On the Edge’ Experience”)

My ‘On The Edge’ moments are present in my daily work. I’m a social worker – helping people to integrate into society and bring them out of isolation. Therefore, I would love to meet Karen Dolva and talk to her about her amazing ‘No Isolation’ project. Maybe that would be something we could also bring to little sick kids and elderly people here in Austria. It would be amazing, if you could make that possible.

Ildikó Artner, Facebook

To the editor,

(in response to the Facebook post “Share your own ‘On the Edge’ Experience”)

I’ve lived with social anxiety and depression since I was 10. For many years I couldn’t shop on my own or even eat in public without a panic attack. After years of therapy I convinced myself to follow my dream of living overseas and came to Vienna. I still get scared sometimes, even over simple things such as trying to order a coffee or speak with my poor German skills but I try. I look at life with a sink or swim attitude; I throw myself off the edge, into the deep end and swim for my life!
I want to be a science writer, so TEDx is the perfect opportunity to meet and hear inspiring individuals. Seeing the achievements of others encourages me to keep trying to reach my life and career goals.

Bonnie-Rai Douglas, Facebook (winner of our ticket competition for this year’s TEDxVienna conference)

To the editor,

(in response to “The Price of Everything“, MET October, 2017)

The fact that shops close up even in very touristy areas of town (such as Kärntner Straße) is such a joke. Anyway just because shops are open doesn’t mean you have to shop.

Elske Lunde Haberl, Facebook

To the editor,

(in response to “The Price of Everything“, MET October, 2017)

It’s a determination to prevent a society from going full tilt consumerist. A nice difference from the U.S.

Mark Talacko, Facebook

To the editor,

(in response to “The Price of Everything“, MET October, 2017)

One day off from consumerism is what the entire planet needs. We are lucky to live in a society that still gives people a day to be.

Mark Long, Facebook

“Hope is not the conviction that something will turn out well, but the certainty that something makes sense, regardless of how it turns out.”

Václav Havel, Czech writer, former dissident and first President of the Czech Republic (1936-2011), in Disturbing the Peace: A Conversation with Karel Hvížd’ala (1986)

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This was written by the Metropole editorial Team. Sometimes its an expat, sometimes a native, most of the time the lines are blurred, and sometimes we're sharing someone else's content, but we always say so. Oh yeah, and buy our magazine! Thanks.