The influential sculptor gets his first major retrospective in Austria

Considered one of the most important German artists of the early 20th century,  Wilhelm Lehmbruck is best known for his melancholy  statues, elongated and abstracted in a mixture of Naturalism and Expressionism.  Taking inspiration from Rodin and Maillol, as well as contemporaries like Alexander Archipenko, Constantin Brâncuși and Amedeo Modigliani, he in turn influenced others like Joseph Beuys, with his sculpture Kniende acting as an eye-catcher for the very first Documenta in 1955.

A comprehensive overview of his work from his student years to his tragic suicide in 1919, about 50 sculpture and 90 paintings, sketches and etchings are shown, his work contrasted with his influences and other contemporaries like George Minne, Käthe Kollwitz, Ernst Barlach and Egon Schiele.


Wilhelm Lehmbruck: Retrospective

 

Through Jul 4, Leopold Museum

 

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