The left is in a crisis

Across the pond, the presidential election ended in an upset after Democrats failed to convince their supporters to unite behind Mrs. Clinton, while dissidents flocked to both the Independent and Green parties.

Still, the right-wing sweep in American politics pales compared to the Old Continent, where centrist and liberal parties have been fragmenting for years.

The lack of a common cause has led to a vacuum, one which opportunists have been quick to exploit. Spain spent 10 months without a government, finally settling for one with less than 40% in Parliament and a hogtied administration. In Hungary and Poland, ultra-conservative parties have seized power, while decades-old coalitions throughout Europe are crumbling and the new ones are held together by no more than empty promises.

While the establishment clings to what’s left of the good old days, the electorate is frustrated. The result? More and more left-of-center parties are left powerless against populist tactics and the demagogues that use them. It may be time to fight fire with fire. After all, agitprop was pioneered by the socialists; and in our age of economic and social instability, the left’s message resonates more than ever.